New EU WEEE Directive and pedelec users

נשלח 4 באוק׳ 2014, 2:14 על ידי Sustainability Org   [ עודכן 4 באוק׳ 2014, 2:14 ]

Standards and technical issues, 22.09.2014

pedelec battery

Bike Europe has reported that 17 out of the 28 EU countries have implemented the new WEEE Directive on the collection and recycling on waste of electrical and electronic equipment[1] .What has this got to do with bikes you ask?

Well pedelecs which are currently keeping the bicycle industry full steam ahead during these financially difficult times have to conform to this Directive to make sure that the batteries and electronic components are properly managed.

The Waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) Directive was first put in place in 2002 to improve the environmental management and end life regulation of electronic components and goods, manufacturers and producers being responsible for the end of life management of waste electrical equipment returned to them by consumers free of charge. The new WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU entered into force on 13 August 2012 and became effective on 14 February 2014.

Retailers must still take back batteries free of charge, but it will mean a change for those collecting and those recycling with recovery and recycling rates targets to be reached. Loopholes in the law have been closed whereby retailers/producers were shipping electric waste to developing countries to be ‘fixed’ when it fact they were being sub-optimally recycled.

Any change for the consumer?

There will be funds available for retailers to promote the fact that consumers can return their old batteries to retailers free of charge. However do be aware that though producers are supposed to shoulder most of the cost, when you buy your pedelec some of the cost will be added to the price tag in the shops, the extra cost though must be indicated to each customer visibly and legibly in writing, in catalogues and on price tickets.

Also if you have bought your pedelec on the internet and need to return the battery all Distance Sellers must have a local based agent responsible to take your battery free of charge.

 

Source: ecf.com

WEEE Widely Implemented for Legal E-Bike Sales

Laws & Regulations

BRUSSELS, Belgium - 17 of the 28 EU member states have now completely implemented the WEEE 2 directive. WEEE is aimed at improving the collection and recycling on waste of electrical and electronic equipment and is with growing e-bike sales of great importance to the bike sector in Europe. Without complying with WEEE legal e-bike sale is not possible.
WEEE is aimed at improving the collection and recycling on waste of electrical and electronic equipment and is with growing e-bike sales of great importance to the bike sector in Europe. – Photo Bike Europe WEEE is aimed at improving the collection and recycling on waste of electrical and electronic equipment and is with growing e-bike sales of great importance to the bike sector in Europe. – Photo Bike Europe

Next to the 17 member states that implemented WEEE most of the other states already took measures to implement the directive. Thus, legal sales in a large part of the most important European markets are only possible if manufacturers, exporters and dealers are registered according to WEEE. www.take-e-way.com offers services for legally compliant sales to Europe-wide selling companies.

Compliant countries

The following countries completely implemented WEEE 2: Austria, Bulgaria, Denmark, Croatia, Estonia, Finland, Great Britain, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal and Slovakia. The current implementation status of WEEE 2 can be watched over on the website of take-e-way.

Support

Complete WEEE solutions for all EU countries in 7 languages

www.take-e-way supports all manufacturers, exporters and dealers in selling e-bikes and other electronic devices in all 28 EU countries in 7 languages: English, Spanish, French, Italian, Dutch, Polish and German. More at www.take-e-way.com

by Jack oortwijn 14 Aug 2014
Source: bike-eu.com
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