The 12 Attributes of Bikeway Networks

נשלח 25 במאי 2011, 11:30 על ידי Sustainability Org   [ עודכן 25 במאי 2011, 11:34 ]
Paul-André Larose, Ph.D. Ontario, Canada (Rev. 2011/05/06)

Cycling can be seen as being Competitive, Recreational or Functional. Consequently, there are three types of Cycling. This document
deals with one of these, namely with Functional Cycling. This form of Active Transportation, generally Intra-Urban in nature, is known as “Cyclo-Mobility”.

For cycling to be widely accepted, it must be safe and it must be perceived as such.

Consequently, we must view and design city streets in a way that is different from that used so far in our Auto-Centric society. A key element is the provision of Bikeways; these can logically complement other streetscape design elements, such as walkways and roadways, without competing against them.

In the same manner that motorized vehicles depend on paved and maintained roads, including plowing when required, similarly bikeways require dedicated and properly maintained infrastructures. These should not be “cosmetic” in nature and only suitable for mild-weather months. Moreover, Bikeways should not be confused with Bike Trails, as these are recreational, i.e. non-functional, in nature.

A Bikeway does not exist in isolation, but rather it is part of a Bikeway Network.

In addition, it has the following Twelve Attributes:
1. Functional: Providing corridors linking ”Need To Go” places
2. Safe: Against moving/parked vehicles for cyclists/pedestrians
3. Secure: No isolated, unlit or inaccessible areas
4. Direct: Minimal addition to travel distance
5. Gap-free: Continuous interconnection of routings
6. Conflict-free: Intersection designs and protocols
7. Extensive: City-wide coverage within 0.5 km reach
8. Unrestricted: Usable at any time, in any season, 24/365
9. Weather-Immune: Splash avoidance and snow clearance
10. Integrative: With street, parking, buildings and transit facilities
11. Beautifying: Adds aesthetic component to urban landscape
12. Appropriate: Design adapted to local specifics

Source: 8-80cities.org
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