New resource: green lane statistics library

פורסם: 15 במרץ 2013, 13:26 על ידי: Sustainability Org   [ עודכן 15 במרץ 2013, 13:26 ]
March 13, 2013

Green lanes are good for streets, good for people, and good for the businesses they neighbor. The Green Lane Project has created a new library of key statistics on the benefits of protected green lanes. New research on green lanes is constantly being released, so check back for new stats. You can also view hundreds more bike-related statistics at the Bikes Belong Statistics Library.

Visit the green lane statistics library



Green Lane Statistics

Green lanes are good for streets, good for people, and good for the businesses they neighbor. Here are key statistics on the benefits of protected green lanes. New research on green lanes is constantly being released, so check back for new stats. You can also view hundreds more bike-related statistics at the Bikes Belong Statistics Library.

 

Economic Benefits

New York City found that protected green lanes had a significant positive impact on local business strength. After the construction of a protected bike
lane on 9th Avenue, local businesses saw a 49 percent increase in retail sales. In comparison, local businesses throughout Manhattan only saw a 3 percent increase in retail sales.

NYC DOT, 2012, Measuring the Street

Rents along New York City's Times Square pedestrian and bicycle paths increased 71% in 2010, the greatest rise in the city.
New York City Department of Transportation, 2011

Portland State University researchers found that customers who arrive by bike spend 24% more per month than those who arrive by car.
Clifton, K., et al., 2012, Business Cycles: Catering to the Bicycling Market

Traveling by bike encourages more frequent stops than a car. In a study of Toronto merchants, patrons arriving by foot and bicycle visit the most often and spend the most money per month.
The Clean Air Partnership, 2009, Bike Lanes, On-street Parking, and Business

Bike friendliness can be a factor in where an individual decides to live and work. In Portland, Ore., where nine percent of downtown workers bike to work, the city surveyed recent transplants to the city who bike in 2009, and 62 percent of respondents said the city’s bike friendliness was a factor in their decision to move there.
Portland Bureau of Transportation, 2009, Portland Bicycle Maps and Information Survey

 

Safety Benefits

A review of 23 studies on bicycling injuries found that bike facilities (e.g. off-road paths, on-road marked bike lanes, and on-road bike routes) are where bicyclists are safest.
Reynolds, C., et al., 2009, The impact of transportation infrastructure on bicycling injuries and crashes: a review of the literature, Environmental Health, 8:47

When protected green lanes are installed in New York City, injury crashes for all road users (drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists) typically drop by 40% and by more than 50% in some locations.
Wolfson, H., 2011, Memorandum on Bike Lanes, City of New York, Office of the Mayor, 21 March 2011

The installation of many miles of new bike lanes in New York City did not lead to an increase in bike crashes, despite the increase in the number of cyclists.
Chen, L., et al., 2011, Evaluating the safety effects of bicycle lanes in New York City, American Journal of Public Health, November 17, 2011

A study found that bicycling on separated facilities like green lanes is safer than riding on streets without bicycle facilities. Cyclists were also 2.5 times more likely to ride on the green lanes than on the streets.
Lusk, A., et al., 2010, Risk of injury for bicycling on cycle tracks versus in the street, Injury Prevention, December 1, 2010

A study found that separated bike paths have better air quality than traditional bike lanes.
Kendrick, C., et al., 2010 in Maus, J., 2010, The impact of bicycle characteristics on bicyclists exposure to traffic-related particulate matter, in press, in "Study: Separated bikeways mean better air quality for bikers, walkers," BikePortland.org

Eighty-six percent of respondents feel “safe” or “very safe” riding on Chicago's Kinzie Street green lane, compared with just 17 percent in traditional bike lanes.
Chicago DOT, 2011, Initial Findings: Kinzie Street Protected Bike Lane

Protected green lanes reduce bicyclist injury risk up to 90 percent.
Teschke, K., et al., 2012, Route Infrastructure and the Risk of Injuries to Bicyclists: A Case-Crossover Study

New York City's protected bike lane on 9th Avenue led to a 56 percent reduction in injuries to all street users, including a 57 percent reduction in injuries to people on bikes and a 29 percent reduction in injuries to people walking, as well as an 84 percent reduction in sidewalk riding.
NYC DOT, 2012, Measuring the Street

Ninety percent of users say they feel safer bicycling on Pennsylvania Ave because of the new green lanes.
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

After New York City installed a protected green lane on Columbus Avenue, traffic crashes, speeding, and sidewalk riding all decreased.
New York City Department of Transportation, 2011, Columbus Avenue parking-protected bicycle path preliminary assessment

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of Americans who don't bicycle say they would like to ride more often.
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008., National Survey of Bicyclist and Pedestrian Attitudes and Behavior

 

What People Want

A survey of Portland, Oregon green lane users found that 70% of respondents thought the green lane made cycling safer and easier. Motorists generally thought that the green lane didn't make driving any less convenient or slower. Only three percent of cyclists didn't use the green lane, compared to before it was installed, when 12% of riders rode in the street instead of in the bike lane.
Monsere, C., et al., 2011, Evaluation of Innovative Bicycle Facilities: SW Broadway Cycle Track & SW Stark/Oak Street Buffered Bike Lanes

A survey of Toronto residents found that 72% support separated green lanes.
Rider, D., 2011, "65% of Torontonians say no to road tolls; 72% want bike lanes," Thestar.com, 3 June 2011

A poll of New York City residents found that 60% support bike lanes, 64% see more New Yorkers biking in the next five years, and 76% want to increase or maintain the number of bike lanes.
Lisberg, A., 2012, "Bike lanes will be old news for new mayor, survey says," City & State, 13 March 2012

A survey of residents near Washington, D.C.'s 16th Street NW green lane revealed that:
- 82% agree that Washington, D.C. should be investing in projects that encourage more people to ride bicycles for transportation
- 89% agree that the city should be investing in projects that improve the safety of bicycling
- 82% agree that bicycling is an important part of the Washington transportation system
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

Nearly 3 in 4 residents surveyed near Washington D.C.'s Pennsylvania Ave. green lane support the lanes and believe them to be a valuable asset to the neighborhood.
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

Residents around the 15th Street green lane in Washington, D.C. say:
- They support the 15th Street green lane (84%)
- The green lane on 15th Street is a valuable asset to the neighborhood (83%)
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

There were more than 100 green lanes on the ground in 32 cities by the end of 2012. The number of American green lanes is expected to double in 2013.
Green Lane Project, 2012, Inventory of Protected Green Lanes

 

If You Build It, They Will Come

From 2006-2011, bicycling in San Francisco increased 71 percent. From 2010-2011, it increased 7 percent, making up 3.5 % of all trips in the city. The greatest growth in bicycling came on Market Street, which has protected green lanes. On Market Street, bicycling increased 115% from 2006, and 43% from 2010.
San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, 2012, 2011 Bicycle Count Report

After buffered green lanes were installed on Philadelphia's Spruce and Pine streets, bike traffic increased 95% and the number of bicyclists riding on the sidewalks decreased by up to 75%
Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, 2010, "Bicycle usage up 95% on Spruce and Pine bike lanes," 10 December 2009

After a green lane was installed on Chicago's Kinzie Street:
- Bicycle ridership on increased 55 percent, according to morning rush hour counts.
- Forty-one percent of respondents changed their usual route to take advantage of the new protected green lane.
- Bicyclists accounted for a majority of all eastbound traffic (53 percent), and more than one third (34 percent) of total street traffic during a CDOT traffic count conducted during morning rush hour in August 2011.
Chicago DOT, 2011, Initial Findings: Kinzie Street Protected Bike Lane

NYC's Prospect Park West protected green lane saw a 190 percent increase in weekday ridership, with 32 percent of those biking under age 12.
NYC DOT, 2012, Prospect Park West: Traffic Calming & Bicycle Path

On D.C,'s Pennsylvania Avenue green lane, bicycle volumes increased 200% after the facilities were installed.
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

After New York City installed a protected green lane on Columbus Avenue, bicycling increased 56% on weekdays.
New York City Department of Transportation, 2011, Columbus Avenue parking-protected bicycle path preliminary assessment

 

Good for Everyone

Sixty-six percent of new bike lanes installed in New York City have no effects on parking or on the number of moving lanes.
Wolfson, H., 2011, Memorandum on Bike Lanes, City of New York, Office of the Mayor, 21 March 2011

After New York City installed a protected green lane on Columbus Avenue: 
- All traffic crashes decreased 34%
- Speeding decreased
- Sidewalk riding decreased
- Traffic flow remained similar
- Commercial loading hours/space increased 475%

New York City Department of Transportation, 2011, Columbus Avenue parking-protected bicycle path preliminary assessment

Forty-nine percent of survey respondents felt motorist behavior improved on Kinzie Street after a green lane was installed.
Chicago DOT, 2011, Initial Findings: Kinzie Street Protected Bike Lane

After Chicago's Kinzie Street green lane was installed, a travel time study found little to no effect on automobile traffic:
- Eastbound morning rush hour travel time from Milwaukee Avenue to Wells Street increased by less than one minute.
- Westbound morning rush hour travel times from Wells Street to Milwaukee Avenue slightly improved.
- Evening rush hour travel time in both directions slightly improved.
Chicago DOT, 2011, Initial Findings: Kinzie Street Protected Bike Lane

Eighty-three percent of surveyed residents around the 15th Street green lane in Washington, D.C. say the lane is a valuable neighborhood asset.
District Department of Transportation, 2012, District Department of Transportation Bicycle Facility Evaluation

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